Traditional recipes

Classic Gougères

Classic Gougères


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makes 2 dozen 1 1/2-inch gougères Servings

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, diced
  • 1 cup unbleached all purpose flour
  • 1 cup (packed) coarsely grated Gruyère cheese (about 4 ounces)
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 400°F. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper.

  • Bring 1 cup water, butter, and salt to simmer in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat, whisking until butter melts. Add flour; stir rapidly with wooden spoon until flour absorbs liquid and forms ball, pulling away from sides of pan. Stir vigorously until film forms on bottom of pan and dough is no longer sticky, 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove pan from heat; cool dough 2 to 3 minutes. Using electric mixer, beat in eggs 1 at a time. Stir in cheese and pepper.

  • Drop rounded tablespoonfuls of dough onto baking sheets, spacing about 3 inches apart. Using damp fingertip, press down any peaks of dough.

  • Bake gougères until golden brown, about 30 minutes, reversing position of pans halfway through baking. Using small sharp knife, pry open 1 gougère to check for doneness (center should be slightly eggy and moist). Serve hot or warm. DO AHEAD Can be made 3 hours ahead. Transfer to racks; cool. Rewarm in 350°F oven for 5 to 10 minutes.

Recipe by Molly Wizenberg,Reviews Section

This French Appetizer Classic Will Never Go Out of Style

Fans of gougères know that there is simply nothing like them. Meltingly fluffy and warm, studded with cheese (or not), and golden and puffy, they’re like the Platonic ideal of a popover, but in one bite, and with cheese. They’re as tasty passed alongside bubbly for New Year’s Eve as they are set out to start a meal off with a bang.

Traditional French appetizers particularly popular in Burgundy, gougères are made from choux pastry, which is nothing more than water, butter, flour and eggs cooked together to make a stiff dough. The addition of cheese—traditionally Gruyère, but there’s no need to be a stickler about it—is what differentiates gougères from other types of choux pastry, which is also used to make éclairs and profiteroles.

Among the many reasons to love them? First, you can make the dough in advance and freeze it. Secondly, they’re so inexpensive to make! (Think about it: butter, flour and cheese.) And lastly, they are perfectly bite-sized. That means you can pass a tray of the hot appetizer without adding fussy little plates or forks. Better for your cleanup, and better for the environment! Here are a few of our favorite gougères, plus a step-by-step of making choux pastry.

Beaufort, Chive and Black Pepper Gougères

Less nutty and with a creamier paste (what cheese aficionados call the inside of a wheel) than its buddies Comté and Gruyère, Beaufort cheese has herbal, floral notes that are just lovely in this version of gougères. A couple of tablespoons of fresh herbs drive the herbaceous aroma home nicely as these bake.

Classic Gougères

Whether you take yours with Parmesan and Gruyère or prefer the slightly less nutty white cheddar rendition, there are absolutely gougères out there designed with you in mind. Remember: Easy, easy, easy. Here’s the step-by-step you’d need for any choux pastry, with images to check your work against if you tackle any of our beloved cheese puffs.

Choux Pastry

Choux (pronounced “shoo”) pastry is the basis for a number of classic French patisseries, from savory gougères to creamy chocolate éclairs. The batter is cooked on the stove top and fashioned into a variety of shapes using a pastry bag, then baked and transformed into delicate shells.


Classic Gougères

Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven preheat to 400°F.

Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper.

Bring 1 cup water, butter, and salt to simmer in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat, whisking until butter melts.

Add flour stir rapidly with wooden spoon until flour absorbs liquid and forms ball, pulling away from sides of pan.

Stir vigorously until film forms on bottom of pan and dough is no longer sticky, 1 to 2 minutes longer.

Remove pan from heat cool dough 2 to 3 minutes. Using electric mixer, beat in eggs 1 at a time. Stir in cheese and pepper.

Drop rounded tablespoonfuls of dough onto baking sheets, spacing about 3 inches apart.

Using damp fingertip, press down any peaks of dough.

Bake gougères until golden brown, about 30 minutes, reversing position of pans halfway through baking.

Using small sharp knife, pry open 1 gougère to check for doneness (center should be slightly eggy and moist).


Gougères

This classic recipe for gougères is made from choux pastry that's topped with shredded Gruyère cheese. It bakes up into airy, tender puffs.

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a large saucepan, combine the water, butter, sugar, and salt and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to moderate. Add the flour all at once and stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until a tight dough forms and pulls away from the side of the pan, 2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.
  3. In a bowl, beat 7 eggs and add to the dough in four batches, stirring vigorously between additions until the eggs are completely incorporated and the pastry is smooth. The dough should be glossy and very slowly hang, stretch and fall from the spoon in thick ribbons. If necessary, beat in the remaining egg.
  4. Transfer the dough to a piping bag fitted with a 1/2-inch plain tip. Pipe 1 1/2-inch mounds onto the baking sheets, leaving 1 inch between them. Sprinkle the mounds with about 1 cup of shredded Gruyère cheese. Bake the gougères about 30 minutes, until browned and puffed, shifting the sheets from top to bottom and front to back halfway through. Serve.


    • 1 1/4 cups white rice flour
    • 1/4 cup cornstarch
    • 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum
    • 3/4 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground ancho chile pepper
    • 1 cup milk or dairy-free milk
    • 1 cup water
    • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter or non-dairy buttery spread, cut into 1-inch pieces
    • 4 large eggs, at room temperature
    • 2 cups shredded Gruyère cheese or dairy-free cheese (about 8 ounces)
    • Coarse salt and cracked black pepper
    1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
    2. Combine the flour, cornstarch, xanthan gum, salt, and chile pepper in a medium mixing bowl.
    3. Combine the milk, water, and butter in a large saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat. Add the dry ingredients and beat briskly with a wooden spoon until thoroughly incorporated. Return the saucepan to the stove and reduce the heat to low. The mixture will begin to pull away from the side of the pan. Stir for 3 to 4 minutes, letting any moisture evaporate.
    4. Remove from the heat and let stand at room temperature for about 5 minutes or until cooled slightly. Add the eggs one at a time, stirring briskly after each addition until the egg is thoroughly incorporated.
    5. Form the dough into 2-tablespoon size mounds and drop onto the baking sheets, leaving 1 to 2 inches between each puff. Top each with a generous tablespoon of cheese and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.
    6. Bake in the oven for 15 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 350°F and bake for 30 minutes longer, rotating the pans halfway through. Turn off the oven and prop open the oven door slightly. Let the puffs cool in the oven for an additional 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.
    7. These can be frozen for up to one month and reheated in a 350°F oven for about 8 minutes. (Do not thaw first.)
    1. Add 2 tablespoons chopped chives and 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese to the dough for an interesting appetizer. Slice the puffs horizontally and fill with shrimp, tuna, or chicken salad.

    From the book Gluten-Free Makeovers, by Beth Hillson. Reprinted by arrangement with Da Capo Lifelong, a member of the Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2011.


    Beef and Bulgur Wheat Meatballs (Kibbeh)

    Kibbeh is a Middle Eastern dish in which finely ground paste of bulgur, onions, and lamb or beef is formed into patties or balls, filled with coarsely ground meat, onions, and pine nuts, and deep-fried. Get the recipe for Beef and Bulgur Wheat Meatballs (Kibbeh) » Todd Coleman

    Gougères

    Gougères are part of a classic Burgundian apéritif, served with glass of bubbly or wine. These airy little cheese puffs are made from savory pâte à choux dough, utilizing the same technique used to make sweet profiteroles and éclairs. We are quite fond of these savory bites, and teach our students to prepare them at every single cooking class. We always add Comté cheese and freshly ground black pepper to the dough, but you can also add mustard or fresh herbs, such as fresh thyme or chives, if you like.

    When making gougères, it’s very important to check the consistency of the dough after you have added the 3rd egg, as it will depend on the size of the eggs you are using. If your eggs are on the smaller size, you may need to add part or all of the 4th egg. To make perfect gougères, it’s important to cook the batter on the stove long enough to remove any excess moisture before adding the eggs. Additionally, make sure the dough is thick and glossy before piping it onto the baking sheet – if the dough is too wet or too thin, it won’t puff up properly.

    6 tablespoons (83 g) unsalted butter

    ⅔ cup (80 g) unbleached all-purpose flour

    2 ounces (55 g) Comté or Gruyère cheese, coarsely grated (about ½ cup), plus 1 ounce (28 g) Comté or Gruyère cheese, finely grated (about ¼ cup), for sprinkling

    ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard (optional)

    ½ teaspoon ground mustard (optional)

    Freshly ground black pepper

    Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C).

    In a small bowl, whisk 1 of the eggs and set aside. Crack the remaining 3 eggs into a separate bowl or measuring cup with a spout. Do not mix set aside.

    To make the choux paste, combine the water, butter, and salt in a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. Melt the butter and bring the mixture to a full boil. Immediately add the flour, all at once, and beat vigorously with a wooden spoon. Continue stirring until the mixture forms a smooth ball that pulls away from the sides of the pan and a film forms on the bottom of the pan, at least 2 to 3 minutes. Reduce the heat to low and continue beating the mixture to remove any excess moisture and dry out the dough, at least 1 to 2 minutes.

    Remove the pan from the heat and let cool slightly then add the 3 eggs, 1 at a time, beating thoroughly with a wooden spoon after each addition. The dough should be shiny and smooth. To test the consistency, use a wooden spoon to scoop out as much of the dough as possible. Hold the wooden spoon over the pot and turn it on its side. If the dough is ready, it will fall from the spoon in a thick plop or dollop. If the dough is too thick, it will just stick to the side of the spoon. If the the dough is too thick, add a small amount of the 1 reserved beaten egg to achieve the right consistency. Be careful not to add too much of the reserved egg or the dough will become too thin. If the dough falls from the spoon like a sheet, it’s too thin and you’ll need to start over. When in doubt, it’s better to have a slightly dry dough to ensure gougères that puff properly when baking. Add the coarsely grated Comté, along with the Dijon mustard and ground mustard, if using. Season with the pepper.

    Place the choux paste in a pastry bag fitted with a large tip. Pipe a small amount of dough in the corners of a baking sheet then line the baking sheet with parchment paper. Pipe roughly 1 ½ inch (4 cm) gougères onto the parchment-lined baking sheet, allowing enough room for them to double in size. Use your fingertips to gently brush the tops of the gougères with a small amount of the reserved beaten egg, being careful not to smash them or let any excess egg fall on the parchment, which will prevent them from rising. Sprinkle the tops with the finely grated Comté. Bake until the gougères are puffed, nicely browned, and feel light for their size, 22 to 25 minutes. Serve warm straight from the oven or let cool completely.


    Classic Gougères - Recipes

    Gougères with Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

    These savory morsels are made from the same base that is used for cream puffs with two differences: Gruyère cheese is added to the paste and, in this case, extra-virgin olive oil is used instead of the customary butter.

    I recently made classic gougères for a Les Dames d&rsquoEscoffier event honoring the publication of Paris to Provence by Ethel Brennan and Sara Remington. Afterward, I started to think about the possibility of making them with extra-virgin olive oil. This recipe is the result.

    4 ½ ounces whole milk
    4 ½ ounces water
    ¾ teaspoon fine sea salt
    3 ounces medium or robust extra-virgin olive oil
    5 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour
    4 large eggs, cracked into a bowl and beaten lightly with a fork
    3 ½ ounces Gruyère cheese, grated

    Position a rack on the middle shelf of the oven and preheat it to 375°F (350°F convection).

    Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

    Put the milk, water, salt, and olive oil in a medium saucepan. Heat until the mixture begins to boil. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the flour all at once and stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until it is absorbed.

    Return the pan to the heat and cook over medium heat for another minute, stirring constantly. Transfer the paste to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle. With the mixer on medium speed, add the eggs in four portions, waiting until each is absorbed before adding another. Beat the cheese into the paste.

    Fit a pastry bag with a ½-inch plain tip. Fill the bag with the paste. Pipe the paste into mounds, 1 ½-inches in diameter, 1 inch apart, onto the baking sheet. If you aren&rsquot adept with a pastry bag, drop the paste onto the baking sheet with a tablespoon. With a moistened fingertip, tamp down the points each mound.

    Bake until the puffs expand and brown, about 20 minutes. They should feel firm to the touch. Cool them on a rack. These are best served the same day that they are baked.


    Gougères

    Gougères are made from one of the mainstays of French classical baking, pâte à choux, or choux paste. It is what éclair shells, crullers, and cream puffs are made from, the dough rising from the large amount of egg mixed in, and the steam that forms as it bakes, raising the elastic dough. They are crisp on the outside, and soft and eggy inside, creating the perfect form to fill like a sandwich with sliced meat or charcuterie, or greens.

    These have a hefty amount of black pepper to balance the richness of the cheese in the dough we use Gruyère, but Cheddar, Swiss, or any of the lower-moisture cheeses work well. The dough is very forgiving, so you can add or subtract flavours easily and make the recipe yours. Try duxelles (minced sautéed mushrooms and shallot), caramelized onions, chopped herbs, pimentòn, or curry. They are best eaten the day they are baked, but you can refresh them in a hot oven for a few minutes if older than a day.

    KITCHEN NOTES: Don’t be tempted to use whole milk instead of nonfat. Because of the amount of butter and cheese, the batter is rich, and the whole milk will cause the Large-Size Gougères to fall. If you do not have nonfat milk, use half water and half whole milk, or just water. To make them ahead, spoon the batter onto the baking sheet, freeze, and store covered in the freezer. The small 1 in [2.5 cm] gougères can be baked straight from the freezer (increase the baking time by 5 to 10 minutes), whereas larger ones need to be defrosted prior to baking.

    Ingredients

    • Nonfat milk 300ml
    • Unsalted butter 140g
    • Salt 1 tsp
    • All-purpose flour 140g
    • Large eggs 5
    • Grated Gruyère cheese, plus more for sprinkling 85g
    • Black pepper, freshly ground 1 tsp
    • Fresh thyme, minced 1 Tbsp

    Directions

    1 Preheat the oven to 180°C. Butter a baking sheet or line with parchment paper.

    2 To make the choux paste, combine the milk, butter, and salt in a heavy saucepan, and place over medium heat until the butter melts and the mixture comes to a full boil. Add the flour all at once, stirring vigorously with a wooden spoon. Keep stirring until the mixture has formed a smooth mass, it pulls away from the sides of the pan, and some of the moisture has evaporated. This will take about 3 minutes.

    3 Transfer the paste to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or to a heatproof mixing bowl. If using a mixer, add the eggs one at a time and mix on medium speed, incorporating each egg before adding the next. When all the eggs have been added, the mixture will be very thick, smooth, and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand, add the cheese, pepper and thyme, and mix in with a rubber spatula. If making by hand, add the eggs one at a time to the bowl and mix with a wooden spoon, incorporating each egg before adding the next one, then proceed as directed for the mixer method.

    4 Transfer the contents of the bowl to a pastry bag fitted with a 1⁄2 in [12 mm] (no. 6 or 7) plain tip, adding only as much to the bag as is comfortable to work with. Pipe 1 in [2.5 cm] mounds onto the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 11⁄2 in [4 cm] apart. Or, use a spoon to drop the dough in 1 in [2.5 cm] mounds.

    5 To make the egg wash, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg and salt, and then gently brush the top of each pastry with the egg wash. Lightly sprinkle the top of each pastry with a little cheese.

    6 Place the pastries in the oven immediately and bake until they have puffed, are nicely browned, and feel light for their size, about 25 minutes. These are delicious served hot or warm, or are also good at room temperature. Or, let cool completely, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a few days, and recrisp in a 180°C oven for 5 minutes.

    7 Large-Size Gougères Variation: To make 4 in/10 cm gougères, use a large spoon to form 3 in [7.5 cm] rounds about 1 in/ 2.5 cm high on the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 2 in [5 cm] apart. Brush with the egg wash and top with the cheese. Bake until they have puffed, are light for their size, and are golden brown, 35 to 45 minutes. Remove from the oven and poke a small hole in the side of each pastry to allow steam to escape. Releasing the steam keeps them from collapsing (this step is unnecessary for the small ones). If splitting and filling, let cool to room temperature otherwise, they may be served hot, warm, or at room temperature.

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