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Vladimir Putin Allegedly Arranged for the Death of a Former Russian Spy with Radioactive Tea

Vladimir Putin Allegedly Arranged for the Death of a Former Russian Spy with Radioactive Tea


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The 2006 death of Alexander Litvinenko — a former Russian spy who got on President Putin’s bad side, has been linked to a radioactive cup of green tea that was served to Litvinenko with the personal approval, if not direction, of Putin himself. Litvinenko was a former officer of the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation or FSB, the successor to the KGB.

The former federal agent was forced to flee to the United Kingdom after he publically criticized the regime for its close ties with the Russian mafia, and accused his superiors of orchestrating the assassination of prominent Russian businessman Boris Berezovsky (another critic of the regime).

In the U.K., Litvinenko became a journalist and a consultant for the British intelligence agencies.

In 2006, Litvinenko met with two former FSB acquaintances, Andrei Lugovoi and Dmitry Kovtun, in the Millennium, an upscale hotel in London, for tea.

According to a groundbreaking report issued this month by a British court of law, Litvinenko’s eventual death from radiation poisoning was sealed during this meeting, when, unbeknownst to him or any member of the hotel staff, a pot of green tea was contaminated with polonium, a radioactive substance.

According to the report, Litvinenko was suspicious enough initially not to drink any of the tea served during the meeting, but eventually acquiesced. “I swallowed several times, but it was green tea with no sugar and it was already cold by the way,” he later told investigators. “I didn’t like it for some reason.”

Litvinenko died in the hospital three weeks later.

Though Putin’s regime has denied any involvement in Litvinenko’s death, the six-month inquiry contends that “the forensic and other evidence strongly indicates that it was during this meeting that Mr. Litvinenko drank green tea poisoned with polonium,” and that President Putin “probably” approved the poisoning.

Radiation testing conducted at the Millennium Hotel later confirmed that one of its porcelain teapots had been used to pour polonium, and that there were traces of radiation throughout the hotel.


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"


Russian spy Sergei Skripal’s poisoning bears haunting similarities to murder of KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko

THE apparent poisoning of exiled Russian spy Sergei Skripal has chilling echoes of the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006.

He was an outspoken critic of the Kremlin before he was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 at a Mayfair hotel in 2006 - allegedly in a hit approved by Vladimir Putin.

Police are urgently trying to establish what substance may have caused Skripal and his daughter Yulia to collapse on a bench in Salisbury, Wilts, on Sunday.

Dust, pollen and other samples from the two latest victims are thought to be being examined at the MoD’s Porton Down bio-warfare labs.

Already Kremlin watchers have said it has all the hallmarks of an assassination attempt by Russian security forces or thugs acting on their behalf.

Putin-linked spooks Dmitri Kovtun and Andrei Lugovoi have been named as the prime suspects in the Litvinenko murder.

Kovtun and Lugovoi both deny they killed him. They are being shielded by the Kremlin which refuses to send them here for trial.

Last night Litvinenko's widow Marina told the Daily Telegraph: "It looks similar to what happened to my husband but we need more information. We need to know the substance. Was it radioactive?"



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