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Beer List for the Farmhouse and Wild Ale Festival

Beer List for the Farmhouse and Wild Ale Festival


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This Saturday and Sunday the 2nd annual Portland Farmhouse and Wild Ale Festival takes place at Saraveza, their Bad Habit Room and even on the street outside that has been closed for the ocassion. And now the full 50+ beer list has been revealed, with some of these beers rotating in over the two days as kegs kick it makes an appealing fest to attend multiple days.
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Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Norwegian farmhouse ale styles

People are confused over what to call Norwegian farmhouse ale and what styles there are. So this is my attempt to clear things up as far as I can. This blog post is about the beers as they are today. The past is much more complicated, and I've covered it earlier.

The Finns and the Swedes have taken a simple approach. In Sweden the brewing is only alive in Gotland (we think), so the beer is called gotlandsdricke. In Finland it's all lumped under the label sahti, even though that "style" probably hides several different styles. Here in Norway we really don't have a single style. Using a single style for Norway would be like claiming rauchbier, barley wine, and Berliner Weisse is the same thing.

In Norway the farmhouse ale used to be called "maltøl" in most of the country. The name simply means "malt beer," which might seem odd, since the definition of beer is that it's made from malts. However, a century ago "øl" (beer) was used for many different drinks: maltøl, sirupsøl (syrup beer), bjørkesevjeøl (birch sap beer), sukkerøl (sugar beer), and so on. In each case, the modifier in front stated what the fermentable was. It seems these were all considered beer simply because they were weaker than wine. In any case "maltøl" was the beer made from malts.

  • Stjørdalsøl: From darkish, smoked home-made malts, with commercial yeast.
  • Kornøl: Pale, hazy, sweet, fruity raw ale with kveik and juniper flavour.
  • Vossaøl: Clearish, dark red or brown, sweetish fruity ale with juniper flavour. Kveik and long boil.

Of course, there's a bit more to it than this, so let's have a closer look.


Watch the video: NEW Farmhouse Home Tour. Farmhouse Home Inspiration. Decorating Ideas (June 2022).