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Mom Responds to Women Who Made Fun of Her at Tim Hortons by Paying It Forward

Mom Responds to Women Who Made Fun of Her at Tim Hortons by Paying It Forward


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A woman responded to the catty remarks of customers waiting in line behind her by paying for their coffee

Dianne Hoffmeyer responded to a hurtful situation in the best way possible.

Dianne Hoffmeyer, a woman who was waiting in line at Tim Hortons in Fort Gratiot, Michigan, had an enviable response to the two women who, while waiting in line behind her, started making fun of Hoffmeyer’s looks.

Hoffmeyer, who was with her 22-month-old baby at the time, was picking up doughnut holes and coffee when she overheard the unkind remarks. “Look at her hair, it’s nasty looking and the roots are coming through,” Hoffmeyer recalled the women saying. They continued, “Oh she’s a whale, oh the whale needs to eat.”

What the women did not know about their target, however, was that Hoffmeyer recently lost 177 pounds.

“I instantly started to cry, because it hurts, Hoffmeyer told WXYZ Detroit,” an ABC affiliate. “I don't know the women. I don't know why they would choose to say something like that.” Instead of confronting the women, however, however, she decided on another strategy.

“I told the cashier, I’ll pay for their coffee.” Hoffmeyer didn’t wait around to see their reaction but told the station that, given the chance to meet them, “I’d like to buy them another cup of coffee, and talk to them. And explain to them how it made me feel.”


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Kids, we're moving in with Grandma

Millennials are called the “boomerang generation” because we’ve been moving back in with our parents in droves. Now that we have kids of our own, we’re bringing them with us, too.

Illustration: Raymond Biesinger

In June 2018 , Carrie Seaton* was paying close to $2,500 a month in child care for her two kids. She and her husband faced a one-and-a-half-hour commute to and from work each day from Mission, BC, to Vancouver, and both had jobs at which late-night meetings were often scheduled at the last minute. They were physically and financially fatigued. So when her father retired, Seaton and her husband offered him their spare bedroom in return for his help. Fast-forward two years and Seaton’s dad has made himself indispensable in their now multi-generational home.

“Pappy makes all the meals. During the school year, he was also helping with getting the kids there and back. Essentially, we have a third parent. We wouldn’t be able to function without him,” she says.

While living with your parents when you’re in your thirties or forties might not feel like an especially grown-up choice, it’s one that many people are making. Multi-generational homes, where three or more generations of the same family reside, are on the rise, according to the most recent census report by Statistics Canada. (This data predates the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Between 2001 and 2016, multi-generational homes were the fastest-growing type of household and saw an increase of 37.5 percent. About 2.2 million people in Canada—or about six percent of the population—are living in a multi-generational home. According to France-Pascale Ménard, an analyst with Statistics Canada, the actual numbers are probably higher. Ménard says these totals don’t include families who are occupying multiple levels of duplexes and triplexes, which is also fairly common. (We also don’t yet know if COVID-19 has led to more families cohabitating for child care reasons.)

Many of us might picture Grammy or Grandad moving in with us eventually, so we can care for them as they age. But more realistically, it’s the adult, millennial children—the “boomerang generation”—who are knocking on their mom and dad’s door. And this time they’re returning with a spouse and little kids, too. For some, it’s an ideal arrangement that solves many logistical and financial issues. But it can also have its challenges when parenting styles clash, space is at a premium and adult children regress into old family dynamics.


Watch the video: Tim Hortons Strawberry Tart commercial 2003 (July 2022).


Comments:

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  2. Fitzsimmons

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