Traditional recipes

Ex-Mayor Steals Mixer for Pizza, and More

Ex-Mayor Steals Mixer for Pizza, and More


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In this week's Media Mix, faster security at airports, plus a judge orders a date as punishment

Arthur Bovino

Weekly Media Mix

The Daily Byte's Weekly Media Mix rounds up the week's big food stories.

Industry
• Dunkin' Donuts is going to India, but they're focusing on food, so they won't be competing with Starbucks. [Business Standard]

Air Travel
• Twenty-eight new airports will adopt a test program where air travelers who voluntarily give background information can go through airport security without removing shoes, belts, and coats. [LA Times]

Restaurants
• Grant Achatz is looking for a New York location for a second branch of The Aviary. [The Daily Meal]

• The new owners of Elaine's plan to open a casual fine dining American restaurant in the historic restaurant's place. [NY Post]

Shame of the Week
• A former California mayor pled guilty to stealing a commercial $1,300 mixer to make pizza dough at home. We think he might be doing it wrong. [AP]

•A judge ordered a man to buy his wife flowers, take her to dinner, and then go bowling with her after he was in court for a minor domestic violence charge because he forgot her birthday, got in a spat, and pushed his wife. [AP]

Trends
• Are cupcakes the edible equivalent of hugs? This writer looks at the psychology behind the cupcake craze. [Washington Post]

Food World
• A "foodie" social network is in the works, linking to Facebook and Twitter to chat about all the dishes they eat and places they go. [Reuters]

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


How to Make Homemade Einkorn Pizza Dough (Oven or Grill)

Growing up, this tradition involved take-out pizza from the closet pizza delivery spot. Sometimes the wait for our Friday night pizza could be hours long, but it was always worth it. I’m not sure if the pizza was really that special or if the tradition of getting pizza every Friday night made the wait worth every minute.

After turning to real food, I realized most take-out pies aren’t made with the best ingredients. Ignorance truly is bliss (well, until your stomach and head start telling you otherwise–which is usually the case with overly-processed food).

Just because we had resolved to avoid processed food, didn’t mean we couldn’t keep my family’s Friday night tradition alive. I knew the solution: making pizza at home, in my own kitchen, where I could use the very best ingredients. There was only one slight problem. At the time, I didn’t exactly know how to cook anything that didn’t come from a box or package.

My first homemade pizza tasted and felt more like cardboard than actual food. My next few attempts were just as bad. Finally, one night, after being served one too many brick-like pizzas, Dustin pleaded, “Why don’t we take a break from pizza for a while.” For someone as stubborn as myself, that just wasn’t going to happen.

After a bit of research about how to make edible homemade pizza, I attempted to make pizza again. That night, I made a completely edible pizza. In fact, it was more than just edible, it was incredible! The crust was crispy and soft. The cheese was melted with a few brown patches, and the sauce was seasoned just right. My family’s tradition could live on, homemade style.

Pizza night is now a family affair. The kids scoop and dump the flour into the designated bowl and then roll out the dough, stealing little pieces of dough after each roll, and Dustin shreds the cheese. At this point, I’ve been appointed to head pizza supervisor, which means I heat the oven, warm the baking stone, and make sure the kids don’t completely devour the raw dough.

On Friday night, I’ll occasionally share a pizza-making picture or video via Instagram Story. Each time I share a homemade pizza creation, I receive questions about the einkorn pizza dough recipe used to make the crust. Most of the time, I refer reader friends to a pizza dough recipe originally published on the blog in 2013. In that post, I shared my recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, which I just updated last year with a note at the bottom to include instructions on making einkorn pizza dough. It’s a bit hard to read through that post and then read through the einkorn notes at the very bottom, so I thought it would be helpful to write a brand new post about making einkorn pizza dough.


Watch the video: The Pizza Kitchen: Varimixer (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Kasim

    It also worries me about this issue.

  2. Wirt

    I regret that I cannot participate in the discussion now. They do not have the required information. But the subject interests me very much.

  3. Reeford

    Very useful phrase

  4. Silvestre

    Very good sentence



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