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Duck fat roast Brussels sprouts recipe

Duck fat roast Brussels sprouts recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes
  • Roasted vegetables
  • Roasted Brussels sprouts

Roast Brussels sprouts get a rich and luxurious makeover with the addition of flavourful duck fat. If you like duck fat roast potatoes, you'll love these!

8 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 2 tablespoons duck fat, or more as needed
  • 900g Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthways
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper, or to taste
  • 1 lemon, juiced

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:35min

  1. Preheat an oven to 230 C / Gas 9. Line a baking tray with parchment.
  2. Heat duck fat in a small saucepan until melted.
  3. Combine Brussels sprouts, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper and melted duck fat in a large bowl until Brussels sprouts are evenly coated. Transfer to the prepared baking tray.
  4. Roast in the preheated oven until Brussels sprouts are browned and tender, but still slightly firm, 15 to 20 minutes. Flip Brussels sprouts over halfway through. Remove from oven and top with freshly squeezed lemon juice just before serving.

See it on my blog

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(17)

Reviews in English (13)

by BigShotsMom

I had just a small amount of duck fat I had been hoarding and this was was a great way to use it. Is duck fat necessary? No, but it adds just that little extra bit of flavor. Thanks, Chef John!-07 Oct 2013

by mommyluvs2cook

This is good! Duck fat is one of my new favorite things and luckily they sell it at a new high end store by me, since I have never cooked with duck to get the fat I was not able to cook the sprout at 450 because I had something else in the oven as well. Still turned out good, but will try at the higher temp. to see if I get them a little crispier. Thanks once again Chef John!!-20 Feb 2015


  • 1 pound Brussels sprouts
  • Handful raw almonds, crushed in a mortar with a pestle
  • Handful fresh pecans, crushed in a mortar with a pestle
  • Handful of dried cranberries
  • 1/4 cup of rendered duck fat
  • Sea Salt, Freshly ground black pepper
  • Extra virgin olive oil

Step 1

Preheat your oven to 450F. Peel off the outer most leaves of each Brussels sprout. Roll the leaves like a cigar, and cut into long strips.

Slowly melt duck fat in a small saucepan.

Cut off and discard the bottom of each sprout, and cut them in half. Arrange single file on a roasting sheet. Drizzle duck fat over sprouts, gently covering each one. Sprinkle on salt and pepper. Roast for 20 minutes, or until they brown. Shake the pan around once while roasting.

Heat up a small cast iron skillet and add a tablespoon of olive oil. Add the crushed nuts and cook for about two minutes, until fragrant. Add the chiffonaded Brussels sprout leaves, stir, and continue cooking for two more minutes. The leaves should still be bright green and not quite wilted. Throw in dried cranberries and cook for one more minute.

Dish the nuts and cranberries until a bowl, spoon Brussels sprouts on top, and sprinkle on a tad more salt. To serve as a main course, serve over brown or wild rice.


Duck Fat Roasted Brussels Sprouts

To Cook 40 minutes How easy? It’s so easy. Serves 5 Luv Rating

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More Modern Australian Recipes

Ingredients

250g Brussels sprouts, cut in half
50g Luv-a-Duck Duck fat
2 garlic cloves, lightly crushed, skin on
2 sprigs of thyme
Sea salt flakes
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1/2 lemon to zest
50g parmesan cheese

Products used

Method

1. Preheat oven to 180°C.
2. Place Brussels sprouts in a bowl with thyme, garlic, sea salt and Luv-a-Duck Duck fat. Toss until combined well.
3. Place on oven tray and bake for 30 mins. Stir sprouts regularly.
4. Remove from oven, squeeze juice of 1/2 lemon on top and toss.
5. Place on plate, zest lemons and grate parmesan on top.

Chef’s Tips

&ldquoDuck fat gives it that really rich flavour. It helps make the Brussel sprouts crispier. I would recommend this to everyone.&rdquoShiva &ndash Home Cook

LUV to Show You How


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Duck fat roast Brussels sprouts recipe - Recipes

This Potato Galette that I had at Chez L’ami Louis in Paris is one of their specialties cooked with duck fat. C’est si bon!

Duck fat is something to quack about. All right, enough of the puns already. Let’s just say that duck fat is to potatoes what bread is to butter. It’s a match made in culinary heaven not only for L’ami Louis’ potato galette, but their potato fries as well.

A pyramid of potato fries at Chez L’Ami Louis. The magic fat also adds zest to roasted potatoes, hash browns, sautéed fingerlings and mashed potatoes. No need for limp, pale fries when this magical fat can deliver potatoes that are crisp and scrumptious.

Before taking up duck fat cooking, I did a little research to lessen the guilt. I discovered it’s not as bad for you as it’s name might imply. It’s low in saturated fat and high in unsaturated fat. Of all the fats, it’s the closest nutritionally to olive oil. In Southwest France, where it’s used most, heart disease is about half of what it is in the rest of France, which is already half that of the U.S.

Duck fat is not just for pairing with potatoes. It’s smooth texture and mild flavor make it perfect for oven-roasted or sautéed vegetables. Use it in pie recipes for extra flakiness, as a wonder rub for roast chicken, a flavor enhancer for popcorn, and to sear meats, poultry and fish. Having a high smoke point makes it perfect for frying and roasting.

So where do you get duck fat without home-rendering? Amazon ($6.49), of course, though I’m sure a conversation with your butcher would reveal other sources as well. I saw on the Internet that Sur La Table in Frontenac has an 11.2-oz jar for $14.95 the same thing is available here for $7.99. If you want to render your own fat, expect to get less than a pint per duck.

I’m adding this recipe to my Thanksgiving table: Duck Fat Roasted Brussels Sprouts, which is a lot easier than the Shredded Brussels Sprouts I usually serve. How could anything with sprouts, shallots, pecans, orange zest AND duck drippings be anything but magnificient! I may even give my Thanksgiving turkey a duck fat massage.


Balsamic glazed Brussels sprouts and Miami Modern

The first time I ate Brussels sprouts that were really good was at a trendy restaurant on Biscayne Boulevard called The Federal, Food Drink and Provisions. It’s only a month later, and I’ve cooked them twice more at home, because they were that yummy.

The Federal is located in the recently designated historic district called, “MiMo,” short for Miami Modern Architecture. Located along the upper east side corridor of Biscayne Boulevard between 54 th and 77 th streets, this is an up-and-coming area for trendy shops and restaurants. Only a few years ago, this area was better-known for drug dealers and hookers, frequenting the seedy, modern-era motels. The motels now have a new coat of paint and (most) of the hookers are gone. Instead, there is a Farmer’s Market, and restaurants pop up faster than we can try them all.

The dinner at The Federal was a blur that night. We met another couple for an “adult” dinner with our tired baby in tow. I ended scarfing down what I could of a the prix fixe Miami Spice menu, in between wrangling a squirmy, screeching baby and sitting outside. The Federal isn’t a family-friendly restaurant. The restaurant only had one high chair and it was occupied. I’m not complaining. All restaurants don’t need to be baby-friendly. And I will return, sans baby, so I can actually enjoy the food. Apparently, we tried about ten dishes between the four of us, and nothing on the menu even looks familiar.

I do remember the Brussels sprouts. They were roasted in a molasses vinaigrette with pickled apples and onions. I remember them being almost black — or maybe it was just dark in the restaurant. I was on the fence about Brussels sprouts before, giving them a chance every year, but never really “loving” this cute little cabbage. Now, I’m in love.


Roast Duck Paired with Potato Dominoes & Roasted Brussels

Add pomegranate juice to a medium saucepan and cook over medium-low heat. Cook for 30 minutes, until the juice has reduced by about half. Watch carefully. If it starts to get too thick and sticky, turn it down to low and move to the next step.

Add sugar, vinegar, wine, orange juice and zest, and a pinch of salt to the reduced pomegranate juice and stir together. Continue cooking over medium-low heat for an additional 20 minutes.

Add pomegranate arils, and season to taste with pepper. Heat an additional few minutes to bring arils up to temperature.

Potato Dominoes

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a large baking sheet or two smaller ones with parchment paper.
  2. Cut off the ends and sides of potatoes so that they are completely devoid of skin, and are the shape of a rectangular prism (see below). />
  3. Using a mandolin set to a thickness of about 2-2.5mm, carefully (seriously, be careful) slice the potatoes. Arrange sliced potatoes overlapping one another (like a little rectangle of fallen dominoes). Each potato should make two rectangle “dominoes”.
  4. Using a pastry brush, brush cooled (but still liquid) duck fat onto the potatoes (about 2 tsp per domino). Sprinkle with salt.
  5. Bake for 35 minutes, until slices are golden brown and crispy around the edges. Let sit to cool for 5 minutes before carefully moving to a serving dish.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Honey, Bomba, and Fried Shallots

  • 3 Medium Shallots, Peeled And Sliced Into Rings
  • About 2 Cups Olive Oil, Separated
  • 2 Lbs Medium Brussels Sprouts, Trimmed And Halved
  • 1 Tsp Salt
  • 2 Tbsp Honey
  • 1 Tbsp Bomba Calabrian Chili Sauce
    1. Place sliced shallots in a small saucepan. Cover with enough olive oil to completely submerge the shallots. Turn heat to medium and cook. Stir constantly until shallots are golden brown (about 10 minutes).
    2. Remove to a paper towel-lined plate to soak up excess oil. Sprinkle with salt. Reserve.
    3. Preheat oven to 400 degrees and line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Toss Brussel sprouts in 2 tablespoons of oil and spread into a single layer on the prepared pan. Sprinkle with 1 tsp salt.
    4. Bake for 30 minutes.
    5. Meanline, in a small bowl stir together honey, chili sauce, and 2 Tbsp olive oil. (Note: if the honey is too sticky to stir as is warm it slightly before mixing.)
    6. After Brussels sprouts have cooked for 30 minutes, turn the oven down to 300 degrees. Carefully remove Brussels sprouts and toss in the chili honey mixture. Place them back on the sheet tray and into the oven for an additional 10 minutes. Brussels sprouts should be golden brown and crispy on the outside, soft and tender on the inside.
    7. Place on a serving player or bowl and top with shallots.

    Haley Burke and Maria McLeod love to create beautiful gatherings, both for their friends and Mella clients in Salt Lake City.

    Mella: Gatherings and Events exists to bring people together at the table to celebrate both big events and the everyday through beautiful food and carefully curated spaces.


    Duck Fat-Roasted Brussels Sprouts

    A few tablespoons of duck and a very hot oven is all you need to turn some sleepy Brussels sprouts into something much more special.

    Original recipe makes 4 servings

    Ingredients

    2 tablespoons duck fat, or more as needed
    2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
    salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    1 pinch cayenne pepper, or more to taste
    1 lemon, juiced

    Directions

    1. Preheat an oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.
    2. Heat duck fat in a small saucepan until melted.
    3. Combine Brussels sprouts, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and melted duck fat in a large bowl until Brussels sprouts are evenly coated. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet.
    4. Bake in the preheated oven until Brussels sprouts are browned and tender, but still slightly firm, 15 to 20 minutes. Flip Brussels sprouts over halfway through. Top with freshly squeezed lemon juice.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 125 kcal
    Carbohydrates: 23.4 g
    Cholesterol: 2 mg
    Fat: 3.1 g
    Fiber: 10 g
    Protein: 8 g
    Sodium: 106 mg


    Roasted Duck with Turnips, Potatoes and Brussels Sprouts

    2 5-6 pound ducks thoroughly defrosted (It is very important that the inner cavity of the duck is not still icy)
    2 yellow onions
    2 stalks of celery
    3 cups of chicken broth
    1 cup dry white wine
    3 cups of brussels sprouts
    3 slices of bacon (optional)
    3 cups of turnips
    3 cups of new potatoes
    1/2 cup chopped shallots

    Place the duck liver, heart and neck in a sauce pan with the chicken broth. Simmer for 1 1/2 hours
    Preheat the oven to 250F. Remove any obvious pieces of fat around the openings of the cavity. Sprinkle the cavities of the ducks with salt and pepper. Quarter the onions and celery and place in the cavities of the ducks. Rub the bodies with olive oil , sprinkle with salt and pepper, and place on a rack in a roasting pan breast side down. Roast at 250F for three hours.

    After the three hours remove the ducks from the pan. Change the temperature to 350F. Pour out the fat and return the ducks, breast side up, to the oven. Cook for 45 min to 1 hr until the duck breasts have an internal temperature of 175F. This will produce a crispy, well done but tender duck. If you like your duck rare in the French style, then adjust the cooking time.

    Par boil the potatoes until they are half way cooked. Quarter the turnips. Slice the ends off of the brussels sprouts and remove some of the outer leaves. Then cut each brussels sprout in half, or in thirds if they are large.

    Strain the duck broth through a sieve and return the broth to the pan. Add the white wine. Return to the fire and cook until reduced to half the amount of liquid.

    When the ducks are fully cooked, remove them from the oven. Pour the pan juices into a spouted degreasing cup. Cover the ducks with foil.

    Pour the degrease drippings through a strainer into the broth. This will probably be a small amount as a duck is very fat. Put two tablespoons of flour mixed completely with 1/3 cup water into the broth. Bring to a boil. Then add 1 tsp. of thyme and a few fresh parsley sprigs and simmer until the broth makes a nice sauce. Salt and pepper to taste.

    Saute the quartered turnips only in the roasting pan in what little drippings remain after having poured off the fat on the top of the stove until tender. Place in a large warmed serving dish. Cover with foil.

    Quarter the new potatoes. Saute them in olive oil in a heavy skillet until lightly browned. Add the chopped shallots and continue to sauté until the potatoes and shallots are crispy, being careful not to burn them. Add salt and pepper to taste and remove to the serving dish with the turnips. Cover with foil.

    Saute the brussels sprouts in olive oil until tender but still a little crispy. Optional. Cook three slices of bacon in the microwave. Crumble the pieces and add to the brussels sprouts.

    Quarter the ducks and place on the serving dish. Pour the sauce over the duck.

    This seems like a lot of work, but it is worth every minute. Coordination of cooking is the key.


    Bacon Fat Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Crispy Garlic and Thyme

    Lately I have had quite the abundance of the wonderful gift to the world known as bacon, and it of course make me even happier knowing it’s pastured, sugar free bacon from a local farm.. Well I say abundance, but there isn’t really such a thing as “too much” bacon in your freezer. Due to the mass quantity of bacon I have been cooking it, a lot. If you have cooked bacon before you would know that when your done slaving over the bacon scented radiating pan there is quite a lot of bacon fat left.

    First off I need you to stop what you are doing and remove your hand from the pouring motion of the pan. You do not want to throw that stuff away. The smoky, aromatic liquid that resides in your pan is total gold dust and shouldn’t be wasted. Instead strain it into a container and store it in the fridge for a delicious cooking oil.

    For the skeptics out there, believe it or not bacon fat is actually incredibly good for you to cook with and you only need a little bit to coat a pan or whatever it is your cooking. It’s full of nutrients and it’s very heat resistant making it perfect for higher heat cooking. Keep in mind that it’s health benefits can only be reaped when you get it from good sourced pork and not the heavily processed chalk full of hormones and shoved into a cage kind. I’m talking more like humanely raised pork, pastured, raised without antibiotics and hormones ever and preferably one that is not cured with sugar. Once you’ve got that down, you’ll have nutritious bacon right in front of you. Words to live by “nutritious bacon”. Remember that.

    I got the idea to use bacon fat in this because as I was surfing the internet, I stumbled upon several recipes of people using duck fat in their Brussels sprout roasting. Sure duck fat is a great cooking utensil and is a foodie magnet of an ingredient when it comes to just about anything in the kitchen. But it still kind of bothered me that no one mentioned bacon fat. Bacon fat seems to have lost it’s reputation in the foodie spectrum now that everyone’s eyes are on duck fat pan fried foie, so I will do my best and try and help bacon fat reclaim it’s tasty title.

    Now you don’t have to use bacon fat in this recipe because to be honest, roasted Brussels sprouts taste good either way, but bacon fat really adds a nice deep flavor to the taste of the Brussels sprouts. Not to mention the smokiness of the bacon fat lends a hand to the sweet freshness of a Brussels sprout.

    As I said though, totally not mandatory to use bacon fat and you’re welcome to use any other oil such as macadamia nut oil, avocado oil or walnut oil. Really what is great about roasting a Brussels sprout is the roasting itself. Or roasting any vegetable for that matter. Roasting a Brussels sprout really brings out it’s sweetness and adds a gorgeous texture. They get this slightly crispy edge around them and brown in little spots which not to mention look mouth watering presentation wise, while the inside gets perfectly cooked and it brings out the natural flavors of the vegetable while toning down any bitterness. So you’re left with a smooth tasting, slightly sweet, slightly smoky tasting Brussels sprout that even the most stout Brussels sprout hater might just swoon over.


    Bacon Fat Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Crispy Garlic and Thyme

    Lately I have had quite the abundance of the wonderful gift to the world known as bacon, and it of course make me even happier knowing it’s pastured, sugar free bacon from a local farm.. Well I say abundance, but there isn’t really such a thing as “too much” bacon in your freezer. Due to the mass quantity of bacon I have been cooking it, a lot. If you have cooked bacon before you would know that when your done slaving over the bacon scented radiating pan there is quite a lot of bacon fat left.

    First off I need you to stop what you are doing and remove your hand from the pouring motion of the pan. You do not want to throw that stuff away. The smoky, aromatic liquid that resides in your pan is total gold dust and shouldn’t be wasted. Instead strain it into a container and store it in the fridge for a delicious cooking oil.

    For the skeptics out there, believe it or not bacon fat is actually incredibly good for you to cook with and you only need a little bit to coat a pan or whatever it is your cooking. It’s full of nutrients and it’s very heat resistant making it perfect for higher heat cooking. Keep in mind that it’s health benefits can only be reaped when you get it from good sourced pork and not the heavily processed chalk full of hormones and shoved into a cage kind. I’m talking more like humanely raised pork, pastured, raised without antibiotics and hormones ever and preferably one that is not cured with sugar. Once you’ve got that down, you’ll have nutritious bacon right in front of you. Words to live by “nutritious bacon”. Remember that.

    I got the idea to use bacon fat in this because as I was surfing the internet, I stumbled upon several recipes of people using duck fat in their Brussels sprout roasting. Sure duck fat is a great cooking utensil and is a foodie magnet of an ingredient when it comes to just about anything in the kitchen. But it still kind of bothered me that no one mentioned bacon fat. Bacon fat seems to have lost it’s reputation in the foodie spectrum now that everyone’s eyes are on duck fat pan fried foie, so I will do my best and try and help bacon fat reclaim it’s tasty title.

    Now you don’t have to use bacon fat in this recipe because to be honest, roasted Brussels sprouts taste good either way, but bacon fat really adds a nice deep flavor to the taste of the Brussels sprouts. Not to mention the smokiness of the bacon fat lends a hand to the sweet freshness of a Brussels sprout.

    As I said though, totally not mandatory to use bacon fat and you’re welcome to use any other oil such as macadamia nut oil, avocado oil or walnut oil. Really what is great about roasting a Brussels sprout is the roasting itself. Or roasting any vegetable for that matter. Roasting a Brussels sprout really brings out it’s sweetness and adds a gorgeous texture. They get this slightly crispy edge around them and brown in little spots which not to mention look mouth watering presentation wise, while the inside gets perfectly cooked and it brings out the natural flavors of the vegetable while toning down any bitterness. So you’re left with a smooth tasting, slightly sweet, slightly smoky tasting Brussels sprout that even the most stout Brussels sprout hater might just swoon over.


    Watch the video: Ο Τραχανάς της θείας Σοφούλας (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Breslin

    As for me, the meaning is revealed further nowhere, the afftor has done the maximum, for which I respect him!

  2. Varden

    This idea has to be purposely

  3. Tristram

    Bravo, fantastic))))

  4. Gujinn

    Excuse me for what I have to intervene ... similar situation. Ready to help.



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